Resources

Here you'll find new evidence and guidance from various sources across a variety of conditions of relevance to different audiences.

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Working with Bilingual Community Health Worker Promotoras to Improve Depression and Self-Care among Latino Patients with Long-Term Health Problems

Major depression, plus other chronic illness such as diabetes, coronary heart disease and heart failure is common among low-income, culturally diverse safety net care patients. Unfortunately, many of these patients are uncomfortable about either asking their doctor questions about their illness and treatment options and their illness self-care or informing their doctors about their treatment preferences.

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Pilot Project: Predicting Who Will Respond Best to Medical Treatments

Recent evidence shows that the results of randomized clinical trials might not apply to individual patients in a straightforward way, even to those within the trial. While randomization ensures the comparability of treatment groups overall, there remain important differences between individuals in each treatment group that can dramatically affect the likelihood of benefiting from or being harmed by a therapy. Averaging effects across such different patients can give misleading results to physicians who care for individual, not average, patients.

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Helping Adults with Serious Mental Illness Improve Their Health and Wellness

This research project is in progress. PCORI will post the research findings on this page within 90 days after the results are final. What is the research about? Serious mental illness such as depression, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia can make it hard for a person to get the health care they need, and their health problems may not be diagnosed or may get worse.

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PCORI Helps Patients Make Treatment Decisions

Watch this video of a prostate cancer survivor talk about helping patients make treatment decisions

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Comparing Three Methods to Help Patients Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a complicated disease that can cause heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, and eye problems. Patients with diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar, follow a diabetic diet, exercise regularly, take multiple medications, and get regular checkups of their blood pressure, cholesterol, eyes, and feet. To assist with organizing these tasks, a community health worker, attached to a patient’s clinic, can help patients understand the care of their diabetes and keep patients in contact with their doctors.

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Fighting Depression with the Power of Community

Inner-city minority groups have reduced access to traditional treatment services for depression; a partnership in Los Angeles expands on existing community resources to improve access to evidence-based services in a community-wide strategy.

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Long-Term Outcomes of Community Engagement to Address Depression Outcomes Disparities

This study extends an existing study in Los Angeles that is partnered between academic and community and client stakeholders. The study has the long-term goal of learning collaboratively how to eliminate disparities in outcomes for persons with depression by improving information and services in inner-city communities of color, using two Los Angeles communities as examples.

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Engaging Communities to Improve Depression Treatment

A coalition-based approach to care, bringing together clinicians and community members, helped people from low-income minority groups.