Research & Reports

Informative research and reports produced by CWHP and aimed at improving our understanding of workforce health and performance, including how to support and improve it.

Population Health to Personalized Medicine: Connecting Disease Indicators to Work Outcomes - Diabetes

miniature workers with large sugar cubes

The CWHP report "Population Health to Personlized Medicine: Connecting Disease Indicators to Work Outcomes - Type 2 Diabetes" presents a framework for connecting disease indicators of diabetes to a variety of work outcomes including absence, job performance, work disability and permanent departure from the workforce. The framework outlines connections between clinical and employer perspectives around worker health and suggests a variety of ways to improve diagnosis and treatment for better health and work-related outcomes.

This series was partially funded through a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award (#2970-CWHP). The views presented in this series are solely the responsibility of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), its Board of Governors or Methodology Committee.

If you would like to be involved in the development of reports, webinars and learning opportunities for this series -- Patient‐Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) Dissemination at Work: How Employers Use Evidence to Make Employee Health Investment Decisions -- please contact Dr. Kimberly Jinnett at kjinnett@tcwhp.org.

 

AttachmentSize
PDF icon Diabetes & Work Outcomes_August 20181.25 MB

Resource
Thursday, October 4th, 2018: V-BID in Diabetes Webinar

Webinar: V-BID in Diabetes At noon on Thursday, October 4th, 2018, the V-BID Center is hosting a webinar in cooperation with the Center for Workforce Health and

How Employers Use Evidence to Make Employee Health Investment Decisions

report cover with workers

The CWHP report "The Employer's Role in Using Research-Based Healthcare Evidence" presents findings and recommendations from a series of interviews with employers and their programmatic solutions partners.  

This series was partially funded through a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Award (#2970-CWHP). The views presented in this series are solely the responsibility of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), its Board of Governors or Methodology Committee.

If you would like to comment on pre-publication versions of content developed for this series -- Patient‐Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) Dissemination at Work: How Employers Use Evidence to Make Employee Health Investment Decisions -- please contact Dr. Kimberly Jinnett at kjinnett@tcwhp.org.

Documents include an employer interview summary report and frameworks tracking clinical indicators to work outcomes for five groups (diabetes, depression, cancer, pain and multimorbidity). Look for webinars and other engagement opportunities to follow.

Resource
PCORI in Practice Webinar: Employers' Use of Patient-Centered Research - Webinar Recording - December 6, 2017

PCORI was pleased to join the Integrated Benefits Institute (IBI) and Center for Workforce Health and Performance (CWHP) to discuss employers' use of patient-centered research. During this webinar, leaders from three major employers discussed their perspective on how employers consider patient-centered research in the design and purchase of employee health benefits. (Read more)

Worker Well-being and High Performance Workplaces: Two Sides of the Same Coin

Small worker figurine standing on large coins

Worker well-being and high performance workplaces are fundamentally linked to each other; we argue that it is difficult to have one without the other.  Of course, how well-being and performance are defined is central to the argument of whether you truly can have one without the other.  What does it mean to have a high performance workplace?  How do we define and think about employee well-being and how it contributes to business value?  These and other topics are explored along with selected research and evidence on these topics.

Download the slide deck with notes presented at the 2nd International Symposium to Advance Total Worker Health held on May 9, 2018 in Bethesda Maryland.

Please contact Dr. Kimberly Jinnett at kjinnett@tcwhp.org if you have any questions or comments about this presentation.

Consumerism, Self-Care Trends and the Broader Value of Health

women shopping

A new CWHP report on Consumerism, Self-Care Trends and the Broader Value of Health suggests the importance of education and tools to assist individuals in making smart treatment decisions -- whether in the formal treatment system or through self-care alternatives. To hold down the costs of healthcare benefits, employers are exploring a variety of strategies aimed at making consumers more aware of the costs of their care in order to influence utilization of that care. Consumer guidance can help employees navigate to appropriate care, whether it is provided through the formal treatment system or through self-care including OTC alternatives. Broader work-related benefits including improved attendance and job performance and less work disability are associated with improved employee health. In light of the consumerism shift in health decision-making, consumer education and decision-support tools may support better choices resulting in improved outcomes for both employees and employers

Cancer in the Workplace - Supporting Treatment for Positive Employee and Employer Results

cancer cells

The big “C” – cancer — can cause panic and feelings of helplessness. These feelings, however, often are shared beyond the patients being screened or treated for the disease. Employers often are unsure of how to help their employees who have been diagnosed with cancer and desire to remain at work during treatment or return to work after care. Yet we know from existing research that having access to proper screening and high quality treatment can have positive effects on these employees’ work outcomes. Since chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes and obesity) and unhealthy lifestyles that contribute to cancer rates are on the rise while innovative cancer treatments are available employers would be wise to consider lessons learned on the topic of cancer in the workplace.

This session, moderated by IBI with practical insights from an employer and provider covered the following:

  • Importance of cancer prevention and treatment to work outcomes and the business imperative
  • CWHP’s recent analysis of cancer and work outcomes including discussion of innovative oncology treatments
  • Provider action – supporting employees during treatment to stay at and/or return to work during and after treatment
  • Employer action – one employer’s approach to supporting employees with cancer
  • Reflection on bringing in broader outcomes to further the business case

Musculoskeletal Disorders, Workforce Health and Productivity in the United States

spine

 

This white paper summarizes what is known about musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the United States and their relationship to employment. We review the major existing clinical, epidemiological and labour market evidence on the prevalence and impact of MSDs in the U.S. working-age population. Musculoskeletal disorders represent a group of conditions that affect the muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, peripheral nerves and supporting blood vessels in the body. MSDs constitute a significant proportion of the disease burden in the United States and have substantial economic implications. Of particular interest to this paper is the impact that MSDs have on people of working age. The white paper draws on a literature review of the existing academic and grey literature looking at the prevalence and impact of MSDs on the labour market in the United States.

The detrimental effect that MSDs have on the U.S. workforce should not be underestimated, in terms of both economic costs to the employer and economic and social costs to the individual. As more employees are expected to work until they are older and obesity levels continue to rise, MSDs are set to become an even larger issue. There are clinical and workplace interventions that can counter this trend and lessen the burden of MSDs on the U.S. labour market.

AttachmentSize
PDF icon download report809.73 KB